Phil Benstein

Perform your own home safety audit using the checklist from PFA located on the menu and here

Inspect and clean your chimney as needed. Factors that effect how often you may need to maintanence your chimney are type of wood burned, how hot you burn your fires, how often you burn, and the construction/age of your fireplace/wood stove and chimney. If in doubt seek the recommendations of a professional chimney sweep.

Check your smoke alarms monthly. Replace them every 10 years. If you don't have smoke alarms in the required locations go get some

Do you have a CO alarm? Many newer fire alarms are now fire and CO combined. Modern CO alarms can also detect hazardous gases like propane. Check with the manufacturer for more information

Keep flammable liquids away from furnaces and water heaters

Monday, 02 May 2016 07:14

AirMedCare Network Membership

Responders on the RCVFD Quick Medical Response Team (QRT) will be the first to tell you a helicopter can save your life unlike any other resource we have. The trip from our most remote location to the level 1 Trauma center (MCR) is about 15min and when seconds count this can be a blessing. But the exspense is also unlike any other resource we have, over $15,000 for that 15 min flight. Many insurance companies will not pay for the flight, others only partially pay. It is for this reason we ask you to check with your medical insurnace provider find out more information and if needed contact AirMedCare Network and talk to them about their membership.
Saturday, 30 April 2016 13:49

April 2016 Ristwatch

Getting Ready for Wildfire Preparedness Day and so much more

Sunday, 17 April 2016 12:20

CPR Guidelines For Residents

  • Call 911 and if not trained in CPR provide Hands-Only CPR, or CPR without breaths, pushing hard and fast in the center of the chest to the rate of 100-120 compressions per minute.

  • If are trained in CPR then perform breaths, add breaths in a 30:2 compressions-to-breaths ratio.

  • When calling  911, place the phone on speaker, so the dispatcher can help you check for breathing, get the precise location and provide instructions for performing CPR.

  • Dispatchers should be trained to help bystanders check for breathing and recognize cardiac arrest. Dispatchers should also be aware that brief generalized seizures may be an early sign of cardiac arrest.

 

Source heart.org

 

About 92 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital, but statistics prove that if more people knew CPR, more lives could be saved. Immediate CPR can double, or even triple, a victim’s chance of survival. The use of CPR dates all the way back to 1740, yet even today, most Americans don’t know how to perform it. Given properly and immediately to sudden cardiac arrest victims, CPR can save lives.  Check out local resources and learn CPR.  Some communities host a quarterly CPR party sponsored by area hospitals. 

Each volunteer responder is certified in basic CPR and participates in frequent CPR refreshers as part of RCVFD's emergency response program.   

 

Thursday, 07 April 2016 17:53

5 Ways To Live Safely in the Rist Canyon

'Harden' the Home Develop or Maintain Defensible Space Find Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Ember Intru
Tuesday, 08 March 2016 09:37

Our Stations

Station 1 Station 3 Station 4

Monday, 22 February 2016 20:56

Donate Now

RCVFD is Donation Based and Tax Exempt (501c3). Any donation you make to RCVFD will be tax exempt and can be deducted.

 

 

Donations can also be sent to:
RCVFD - Treasurer
PO Box 2
Bellvue, CO 80512

Questions, contact the Treasurer on the contact page.

 

Sunday, 21 February 2016 13:52

Recent Major Responses

In 2011 we suffered the Crystal Fire. This fire, which was man caused, started on Crystal Mountain south west of the Buckhorn.  Initially contained to about 20 acres, the Crystal fire was fanned by a sudden nighttime windstorm with winds reaching 70mph or more.  The fire grew to over 3000 acres in a matter of minutes and destroyed several homes.  Because the wind struck very late at night, it was a critical and life threatening situation.  The Crystal fire was the first major fire in the RCVFD area in 30 plus years.

On June 9, 2012, a lightning-sparked fire in the Buckhorn became the wind driven inferno known as the High Park fire. High Park burned over 89,000 acres and destroyed some 254 homes and countless other buildings and took 1 life.  The area was evacuated for nearly 21 days.  Two years later, RCVFD and our community is recovering – showing a determination and effort that is truly amazing.

September 2013 floods In 2013 the front range of Colorado had an extended upslope storm that dumped 14.6 inches of rain at RCVFD station 1. This storm caused a 500-1000 year flood event that destroyed roads and properties up and down the Colorado front range.  Because of High Park, and the expected flooding that comes after a wildland fire, RCVFD and our residents weathered the flood better than most.  We had been preparing for flooding from the High Park burn for a year.  Still, of the 3 roads in the RCVFD area, only Rist Canyon Road survived and it was damaged.  Since then, Rist Canyon, Stove Prairie and the upper Buckhorn roads have been repaired (though the upper Buckhorn is a temporary repair).  The lower Buckhorn remains closed.  That road will be rebuilt during 2014.

hrough all these events, the men and women of RCVFD and the community we live in rallied and responded.  The High Park fire response is a model of response and interagency cooperation.  The years of planning and training at RCVFD, and work in our community, paid off during High Park.  While it was an event without parallel, it was a model of human resources.  After High Park, RCVFD Chief Robert Gann was awarded the first ever Wildland Safety Exemplary Service Award by the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) at the 2013 Backyards and Beyond conference.

Sunday, 21 February 2016 13:47

RCVFD Funding Sources

RCVFD is a 100% donation-based volunteer fire department.  We achieve this through  donations grants, and various fund raising events.  Since RCVFD is a 501(c)3 all donations are tax-deductible.  From the construction of our firehouses, the purchases of equipment and clothing all the way to our volunteers that are on the front lines, RCVFD provides a model what can happen when a community supports and cares for its fire department.
Sunday, 21 February 2016 13:46

RCVFD Response Profile

 RCVFD responds to between 50 and 100 calls per year.  Currently, the mixture is about 50/50 fire/medical (rescue).  RCVFD is a classic Wildland Urban Interface (houses in the woods) fire department and faces all the challenges created by that. As the population density and number of visitors to our area increases, RCVFD continues to see a more diverse set of responses and a higher level of expectation.  It is important that, if you visit or live in a rural area such as RCVFD’s response area, you understand the limitations imposed upon emergency response by that area.  The fact that we have no hydrant system and must deal with diverse weather and topography and long travel distances (not to mention volunteer staff) means that RCVFD will probably never provide the 4-minute response expected in town.  This means that we (RCVFD and the community) must work together to provide appropriate and timely responses.  RCVFD is committed to providing the very best professional emergency services we can and we continually strive to improve or expand our services.  Your support is critical.
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